social media

I am often asked about social media and how jewellers should use them for digital marketing. And usually they’re are after a recipe: this may celebrity posts, this many product posts and this many ‘events’ posts and WE’RE ALL SET.

It’s very very hard to explain that this isn’t exactly how it works. That you have to find your own voice and figure out how to communicate your brand values. That your business needs to have a personality. When you follow the brands that do it REALLY well, like Astley Clarke, Tiffany, Stone and Strand, you feel that they are sharing their passion with you, that you get a glimpse into their world, a insider look at who they are and what they do. And with other companies you know are being ‘marketed to’ and ‘talked at’. Shown products. I can’t explain it any better than that, and unfortunately following a recipe or worse, copying the ‘good’ ones just doesn’t work. What works for one company, might not work for another.

The absolute best example is Boden. If you know the brand, the moment I mention this name you have an image in your head: colour, fun, style, happiness, polka dots, yellow jackets.. and so on. They manage to create a ‘vibe’ and a whole ‘boden world’; someone there has an amazing ‘voice’ to put to the brand. But that style/vibe might not work for your business, if you try to copy Boden or Tiffany, it’s very obvious. Instead, you should try and tap into the core values, figure out what your brand is really about and what makes it different than any other, find a way to let the passion for what you do to speak through the social media content. And include some fun in there too, a bit of playfulness works a treat :D

e-commerce and retail – the next big thing?

Got to discussing the Next Big Thing in e-commerce with a friend yesterday.
Personally, I think the single user view is the next big ‘to do’, collating online and offline customer data could be a dealbreaker when it comes to targeting and personalisation. Online buying patterns might differ greatly from the offline brick and mortar shop purchases and the retailers need to find a way to collate those data sets, using the ‘digital passport’ or any other means.
To be effective, the marketing message needs to be consistent and carefully targeted across ALL channels. You might be missing huge opportunities, if your print marketing is different to your online, because you’re going on store purchases. Or if you’re segmenting, and marketing to, your online customers based on their online purchases (while they would only buy silver under £500 on your site, the same person might happily buy precious jewellery over £1,000 in your store).

My friend, a digital marketer herself, thinks that an even bigger shift to mobile devices, mainly tablets, is the one to look for. Any company adapted and prepared for that is going to win big (much scope for creative segmenting here as well). Recent data trends (via dotRising) seem to support that…

time will tell..

Fast pace of digital

Couple of talks at recent digital marketing events made me realise that we’re all scrambling hard to keep the pace. We were all happy to deploy our shiny new responsive sites, only to see bootstrap release v3, now it’s the mobile-first approach. Adaptive is the new responsive, twitter cards are already old hat, Facebook business pages go through yet another update. Not to mention all the new APIs for e-commerce and fulfillment. You’ve deployed the universal analytics but that’s not quite enough. Segmentation is the new black, and it all takes time to implement and adjust your digital offering to new approach, personalization and all. And why are you not on Vime??

It was refreshing to hear others admit honestly that they are also finding the pace challenging. Don’t get me wrong, I love it, that’s why we’re all in digital, right? Because it offers so much variety and adapts quickly to new times. But it does all make your head swirl. Just a bit :)

digital marketing trends

Strongly recommend Econsultancy and dotRising, two brilliant resources on digital marketing and the upcoming trends. They carry a wide selection of topics, with very good in-depth data driven analysis, as well as superb walk-throughs and examples from real campaigns.

Another regular read is TrendWatching, focused on new marketing approaches and strategy in general, not just digital. Their briefings give real insight into changing consumer trends, with very good implementation examples.